Lauren Leto

The Blind Assassin

Posted in book porn by Lauren Leto on February 15, 2010

Last summer, I wrote about plots that can effectively switch viewpoints (and those that can’t). The Blind Assassin got it right.

The Blind Assassin beautifully balances press clippings, first person narrative and a science fiction novel (aptly titled The Blind Assassin).

I cried during The Threshold. I’m not a sucker for romances, I’m a sucker for family drama.

This being said, I do have to note that Atwood uses the word “just” too much. It’s distracting and unnecessary. (Those who can’t do, criticize – I know, I know).

Elder Iris Chase is full of pluck, at times it surprises you. Such as:

Myra, take note if you’re reading this: in the days before he was hewn into a pillar of the community by Reenie, your father was a notable souse. p. 184

And:

“I’m not senile,” I snapped. “If I burn the house down it will be on purpose.” p. 310

And:

At first they’d thought – naturally – that I myself must be the burned woman found in the wreck.

Now that would have been news. p. 492

She is who I want to be when I grow up (and also, not who I want to be – she was too wrapped up in who she ought to be, instead of who she wanted to be).

Does anyone have an opinion about Atwood’s use of correct punctuation while quoting people during the book and her lack of it while transcribing The Blind Assassin into the book?

Iris Chase’s observations about small details are superb:

Or simply graffiti: Mary Loves John. But John does not love Mary, or not enough. Not enough to save her from emptying herself our like that, scribbling all over everyone in such red, red letters.

An old story. p. 325

I have a love for Winifred’s character like I have a love for the evil queen in Snow White.

Never do anything too well, said Winifred, it shows you’re trying. p. 377

One Response

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  1. Sindhu said, on March 8, 2010 at 12:44 am

    I love that book! I was so lost in the story while reading it and it haunts me every now and then to this day.


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